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tv   Liberally Stephanie Miller  Current  June 10, 2013 6:00am-9:01am PDT

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[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: all right. happy monday, everybody. happy post pride. i'm wearing my pride t-shirt. by the way i asked travis how his pride was. he said 31 bottles of champagne which makes mama proud. good morning, jacki schechner. >> i think i have a picture of the 31 bottles of champagne. >> stephanie: i couldn't be prouder. >> i can tweet that out for you if you want photographic evidence. how sloshy it all got. ♪ 31 bottles of champagne on the
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wall ♪ >> stephanie: lots of breaking news left and right. let's start with jacki schechner in the current news center. >> good morning. happy monday, everybody. we now know who leaked information to the press about the national security agency and its methods of collecting and sifting through phone and internet data. 29-year-old edward snowden is a former c.i.a. computer tech now explaining himself via video from a hotel room in hong kong. most recently, he worked for booth alen hamilton, a government contractor at an nsa facility in hawaii. he copied the now opinion public documents and said he needed time off for a medical issue then he left for hong kong which does have an extradition agreement with the u.s. and a history of cooperation. snowden's actions were called shock and a grave violation of the firm's conduct and core values. what you were seeing there was snowden's home in hawaii where he used to work. why did snowden do it? he felt an escalating sense
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something was wrong and it wasn't getting the attention it deserved. >> the more you talk about it, the more you're ignored the more you're told it's not a problem until eventually you realize that these things need to be determined by the public, not by somebody who was simply hired by the government. >> it is yet to be seen how the u.s. government will deal with snowden but it's impossible not to discuss what may or may not happen in light of fact that private first class bradley manning is currently on trial. his court-martial continues today for charges he gave classified information to wikileaks and he faces life in prison. jury selection begins today in the george zimmerman trial. he is facing second-degree murder charges for shooting 17-year-old trayvon martin back in february of 2012. 500 potential jurors need to be whittle down to six and four alternates. potential jurors will be allowed to go home, they won't be sequestered at night but their names will remain confidential. a lot of other news and plenty
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of show ahead. we'll see you after the break. stay with us.
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cenk off air alright in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks! i think the number 1 thing than viewers like about the young turks is that were honest. they know that i'm not bsing them for some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know i'm going to be the first one to call them out. cenk on air>> what's unacceptable is how washington continues to screw the middle class over. cenk off air i don't want the middle class taking the brunt of the spending cuts and all the different programs that wind up hurting the middle class. cenk on air you got to go to the local level, the state level and we have to fight hard to make sure they can't buy our politics anymore. cenk off air and they can question if i'm right about that. but i think the audience gets that, i actually mean it. cenk on air 3 cuts! narrator uniquely progressive and always topical the worlds largest online news show is on current tv. cenk off air and i think the audience
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gets, "this guys to best of his abilities is trying to look out for us." only on current tv! [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: okay. happy monday. six minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. stephaniemiller.com. you can e-mail us all there. executive producer, chris lavoie, voice deity jim ward. we know the guy -- who the leaker is. his name is edward snowden. the man behind the nsa leaks. 29 years old. revealed himself -- you were telling me, that's kind of fascinating. he can literally tap anybody
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including up to the president of the united states. >> that's right. he said -- that's what he said. that goes in direct conflict with what the nsa has been saying all along. >> hello, they lied. >> we don't know who's telling the truth but that's what snowden says. >> i believe him. >> why? >> more than the official nsa. >> why? >> because that's their job is to misinform. >> stephanie: he's a high school dropout. >> not necessarily. >> stephanie: i was just going to say that. okay. he's a high school dropout who worked his way into the most secretive computers in the u.s. intelligence as a defense contractor only to bloat secrets wide open by spilling details of classified surveillance programs. he regaled himself as a -- he could track e-mails of all americans. he just wanted the public to know what the government was doing. we'll talk to rude pundit in a few minutes. he said a you're an idiot if you didn't already know this was
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happening. >> that is the patriot act. >> stephanie: i gotta say i agree with what the president said. we can't have 100% security and 100% privacy. you have to make the trade-off to some degree. it is a choice that we have to make. i was talking to a friend who is just as liberal as i am, she said is it weird that i don't really -- jacki schechner said that last week. i don't care that much about this. >> as long as it goes through a court. that's the only caveat. if we find that some of this hasn't gone through a court i'm going to be pissed. >> stephanie: right. so he said even if you're not doing anything, you're being watched and recorded. i'm just another guy who sits here day to day. this is the interview he gave overnight. i'm just another guy who sits there day to day in the office and watches what's happening this is something not our place to decide. the public needs to decide if these programs and policies are right or wrong.
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he fled to hong kong three weeks ago after copying one set of documents and said he needed to go away for medical treatment. he worked for a major contractor in hawaii earning a $200,000 salary a year. he told the guardian, he never received a high school diploma didn't complete his studies at community college. wow! how do you get one of those fancy jobs. he later worked as a security guard for the nsa and took the computer security guard with the c.i.a. that's a little stunning. he said he has access to the full rosters of everyone working at the nsa the entire intelligence community and undercover assets around the world. screening of who works the nsa yikes. >> i see a movie starring adam sandler. >> stephanie: right. >> some on oahu are glad he left. good riddance, thanks for leaving someone told a cnn affiliate there. i'm sure the guy had an overrackettive mother teresa
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gene but he was foolish. we expect the government to honor our privacy but also to protect us from terrorist attacks. yep, the firm he worked for said news reports this individual leaked information. this is breaking core values of our firm. jim, we may all differ on this. but how do you not prosecute that? >> daniel elsburg has a great article in "the washington post." he said i'm sure president obama would have sought -- >> stephanie: film do you do like this guy? if you want to leak a lot of classified information -- >> no. look, he makes the point that we need whistle-blowers. by any standard, that's what
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manning should have done so the american public could see what we're doing over there. for them to charge him is an outrageous sensibility going after the man who exposes the war crime instead of any of the ones who did it. >> stephanie: is this a war crime? >> i'm talking about bradley manning. >> we're talking about snowden. >> stephanie: that's what i'm saying. i think you made the cogent point. if this is -- we bitched about during the bush administration. >> if we have a warrant it's fine. president obama when he was candidate obama, he campaigned on the fact that we need to be doing this with a warrant. and so if we find out it hasn't been done with a warrant -- >> stephanie: i understand it is tough stuff. my friend and i were talking yesterday. you have to -- we admitted this on the air last week. if it were bush, might we feel -- probably. do i inherently trust this
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president more? yes. is it still troubling and out of line? we need to know more details? yeah. that to me was the big thing during the bush administration was warrantless wiretapping and i remember him saying no, no, you got to get a warrant for this sort of thing. that was the whole point is he was not. right? he was not. >> right. >> stephanie: the president. this is what i was talking about he said over the weekend. >> obama: you can't have 100% security and also then have 100% privacy and zero inconvenience. >> stephanie: by the way facebook and google, did you see this? using suspiciously similar language to deny giving the nsa access. facebook ceo mark zuckerberg and google cofounder both published statements on their respective web sites on friday emphatically claiming they knew nothing of prism in which the government said it was allowed access to servers by nine major internet companies. neither claimed to have heard of
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prism before yesterday. in fact, they both used the exact same sentence. we haven't heard of prism before yesterday. zuckerberg said we have not heard of a program called prism until yesterday. just changed a couple of words. what they were focusing on was quote-unquote direct access. google wrote we have not joined any program that would give the u.s. government or any other government direct access to our servers. >> that's an interesting word. >> stephanie: facebook said almost a similar thing. i'm not certain what that means. >> it sounds like they were given a script to use by somebody. >> stephanie: right. >> why we have never heard of this company until just now. >> stephanie: we don't know. [ ♪ hypnotic ♪ ] >> something fishy there. >> and you are -- and you're from -- >> stephanie: exactly. and obviously the one thing that they -- the president and others keep repeating is nobody is listening to calls. >> obama: nobody is listening to your telephone calls.
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>> stephanie: people to be bored to death with mine. >> i don't even make phone calls anymore. i just text people. >> stephanie: somebody made the point yesterday the people at the nsa they said if anything, their people that are even more aware of not overreaching or not -- you know, i don't know to what degree that's true. they were talking about that. they're not listening to your calls. they're trained in what they're looking for. >> that could change in september when that facility in utah goes online. >> stephanie: we don't know what will change and how. >> well -- >> stephanie: okay. >> so we're just guessing. >> no, i'm not -- it is from -- >> from -- substantiate your claim. >> i have to find it. >> stephanie: the president meantime. >> obama: i welcome this debate. and i think it's healthy for our democracy. i think it is a sign of maturity because probably five years ago six years ago we might not have been having this debate.
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>> stephanie: you said somebody on facebook -- on your facebook page said that last week they wondered if this leak was on purpose to have this debate. i don't know. >> could be. >> interesting idea. >> you know, i hope the president leaked it so that we could have this debate. because it is an important debate. i hope it lights a fire under congress to get rid of the most heinous parts of the patriot act. >> stephanie: ed snowden the nsa whistle-blower did an interview overnight. >> my name's ed snowden. i'm 29 years old. i work for booze allen hamilton as an infrastructure analyst for nsa in hawaii. i sit at my desk, certainly had the authority to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal e-mail. >> stephanie: the president's probably like what now? wait a minute. >> i didn't sign up for that. >> stephanie: wait a second. did i allow that?
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>> yikes! >> i'm just another guy who sits there day to day in the office, watches what's happening and goes this is something that's not our place to decide. the public needs to decide whether these programs and policies are right or wrong. >> stephanie: so i guess -- what they're talking about is extradition that we have, that they're not sure what is going to happen. >> iceland this morning has indicated they would give snowden asylum. >> stephanie: james clapper national intelligence director yesterday. >> under strict court supervision, have to get stricter. so the notion that we're trolling through everyone's e-mails and voyeuristically reading them or listening to everyone's phone calls is on its face absurd. we couldn't do it even if we wanted to and i assure you we don't want to. >> it goes against what snowden just said in the interview. >> hmm. >> interesting. >> stephanie: 17 minutes after
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the hour. lots of people have things on this. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> announcer: for a good time, call now 1-800-steph-12. if you believe in state's rights but still support the drug war you must be high. >> i think the number one thing that viewers like about "the young turks" is that we're honest. i think the audience gets that i actually mean it. >> you're putting out there something that you're proud of. journalists want the the story and they want the right story and the want the true story. >> you can say anything here. >> i spent a couple of hours with a hooker. >> your mistake was writing a check. >> she never cashed it! >> the war room. >> compared to other countries with tighter gun safety laws our death toll is just staggering. >> the young turks. >> the top bankers who funneled all the money to the drug lords, no sentence. there's just no justice in that. >> viewpoint. >> carl rove said today that mitt romney is a lock to win
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anywhere. rude pundit coming up at the bottom of the hour. we were talking about the whistle-blower -- the nsa whistle-blower, ed snowden. >> yes. >> stephanie: he hopes hong kong's climate of free speech will protect him. there's no guarantee he won't be sent back to the u.s. all is breaking overnight according to the guardian. >> iceland, iceland, here i come. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: according to the guardian, the only time he became emotional is when he thought about what might happen to his relatives many of whom work for the u.s. government. i would argue you also could have thought of that ahead of time. it is going to be open to -- you know, obviously a lot of discussion as to whether this guy is a hero or criminal or both to some people. james clapper national intelligence director yesterday. >> this is someone for whatever reason has chosen to violate a sacred trust for this country. the damage that these revelations incur are huge.
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>> that's what they say about daniel ellsberg, too. >> stephanie: right. this is different. this is not war crimes. paul in illinois. you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi, paul. >> caller: hello, stephanie. >> stephanie: hello. go ahead. >> caller: i'm just wondering everybody who's also paranoid about the federal government coming after you and this and that on one time, seems to be a paradox, while they're collecting this information why don't they snuff out the whistle-blowers before they got to reveal them if they were so all-powerful and all overreaching. understand? >> no. how do you get a whistle-blower before he becomes a whistle-blower? >> stephanie: right. how do you know? >> caller: they apparently didn't stop them. so apparently all -- >> well, maybe they're planned leaks. maybe they're using them. >> stephanie: how would you know, paul, if someone is going to become a whistle-blower? >> caller: well, exactly that.
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so if they know everything about everybody, if they're studying everything about everybody we have two chains of thought in this country by the rand pauls and truthfully, libertarians so that the government is going to take over everything on the one hand on the other hand, they're going to come after us. but yet they complain, too the government is inefficient and doesn't work. >> stephanie: speaking of libertarians rand paul irritates the bejesus out of me because he tries to link things that aren't linked. benghazi and the i.r.s. and now this. those are separate things. the first couple are nothing burgers. it is trying to -- there are two groups of people who want obama bad. this is another version of obama bad. >> even my hard core libertarian roommate has had it with rand paul. hates him now. >> stephanie: because it's like yes yes yes no!
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no! those last two things you said, no! hey, rob welcome. >> caller: how you doing stephanie? >> stephanie: good. go ahead. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. i just wanted to say on your top thick morning, i think this gentleman is an absolute american hero because the american people need to know what's going on and the constitution says if a law is made, meaning the patriot act or any of the other acts that is unconstitutional, you do not have to follow it. that's the law. so he has not broken any laws. he's not giving out -- >> stephanie: wait a minute, rob. when we can debate the patriot act and we certainly have on this show but the fact is it is the law and both parties voted this in and vote to re-authorize it. >> caller: stephanie, with all due respect. >> stephanie: let me finish. it is different than war crimes. obviously that's a war crime. what i'm saying is we can debate and chris has said this many times about we should amend the
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patriot act or change it. but that's the law. >> caller: well, yeah -- >> you can't have anarchy and not follow the law. you take this into court and have it decided in the courts. that's our system of justice. >> stephanie: that's why i think jim -- jim said last week, when they first started screaming this is an abuse of the patriot act no, it's not. this is what we agreed to. this is the patriot act. right? >> caller: it is, ladies and gentlemen. but you know, the american people are so busy working hard and taking care of their kids, like you pointed out these pages and pages and pages of laws, people don't have time to read these. in fact, you just pointed out on your show moments ago that the patriot act they had it dumped on them. they had less than 24 hours to read it. so even our elected congresspeople didn't even know what they were signing. >> stephanie: as jim has said, it also was signed in a climate of fear after 9-11. climate of fear like we've never known. >> two guys who were authorized to investigate it before they signed on to it got anthrax
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letters sent to them from a domestic source. >> caller: i'm glad you guys are covering this because listen, this is the tip of the iceberg. there is a much bigger thing going on here. can i share it with you? >> stephanie: sure. >> caller: okay. this isn't democrat versus republican. >> stephanie: no, it's not. >> caller: this is not liberal versus conservative. what it is there's a war going on. an international war and the real enemy is not al-qaeda. al-qaeda is a construct of the u.s. government. they work for the c.i.a. what this is it is a war -- let's say what it is. it is a war against the ilume knotty and a war against the new world order. if your people would do their research, quit watching the oscars, quit watching tv, quit doing all of this stuff and start doing research because these are indicators, stephanie. >> stephanie: i plame you chris, i do.
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>> you could do both. >> stephanie: for watching the oscars. >> you can dvr it. >> have to tell people to stop doing stuff that's fun and just research things. >> stop doodling! do research! >> stephanie: lisa in houston. >> listening to music, you're wasting time! you should be researching. >> stephanie: stop watching that cat video. >> caller: that guy who just finished, he got that all coast-to-coast. my radio stop on that station when i want a good laugh. >> stephanie: stragglers still up from listening to coast-to-coast. >> caller: look, first of all we need to -- the media i think is jumping the gun with these guys. this guy never say it that he actually did it. he's hypothetical. i could if i wanted to. the reason he can't is because the safety nets are in place and he couldn't do all he's doing guys, is look at a database that's performing a query that's told to match a certain number
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and if it matches they look to see how long that person has been and on the phone with that person, that's all it is doing is a query. he just happens to see that. he does not have any control because he never once -- he didn't say it, you know, i've listened in on people's wiretaps >> he said i could if i wanted to. >> caller: the reason he can't is because there is a safeguard there. if he tried to dial somebody's number or type into that e-mail, it is going to spit back up. but here's the other thing we need to also remember. when people say he didn't hurt anybody, you know as shocked as we are you know who else was shocked? the terrorists. so now we've got to try to figure out another way to capture them. >> stephanie: right. that part was not helpful. 29 minutes after the hour. let's see what rude pundit thinks next on "the stephanie miller show."
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this show is about analyzing criticizing, and holding policy to the fire. are you encouraged by what you heard the president say the other night? is this personal, or is it political? a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i'm given to doing anyway, by staying in touch with everything that is going on politically and putting my own nuance on it. in reality it's not like they actually care. this is purely about political grandstanding. i've worn lots of hats, but i've always kept this going. i've been doing politics now for a dozen years. (vo) he's been called the epic politics man. he's michael shure and his arena is the war room. >> these republicans in congress that think the world ends at the atlantic ocean border and pacific ocean border. the bloggers and the people that are sort of compiling the best of the day. i do a lot of looking at those people as well. not only does senator rubio just care about rich people, but somehow he thinks raising the minimum wage is a bad idea for the middle class. but we do care about them right?
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>> you see, women are a lot like "saturday night live" sketches lots of them are awful some are decent and a few are pretty good. but then there's that one. that one woman who's as amazingly perfect asthmassive head wound harry. for me, that woman is -- >> stephanie miller. >> stephanie: oh, thank you. >> sweetest thing anyone has ever said about you. massive head wound harry. >> i to under that article from wired magazine from last year. about the utah data center. under construction by contractors of top secret clearances, the blandly named utah clearance center is being built for the national security agency. it is final piece of the puzzle assembled over the past decade.
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its purpose to intercept decipher and analyze vast swaths of the communication and zip through the undersea cables of international, foreign and snick networks. heavily fortified $2 billion center should be up and running september of 2013. stored will be all forms of communication including private e-mails, cell phone calls and google searches as well as all sorts of personal data trails, travel receipts, parking receipts. it is part of the awareness program that was killed by congress in 2003 after it caused an outcry over its potential. >> what's the source for this? >> wired magazine. >> i wonder where they got their info. >> stephanie: i need to stop oversharing. that's the main thing. entirely too chatty. in e-mails. okay. rudeness wrote one of the best things i've heard about. ♪
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♪ ooh papa, papa, papa ooh ♪ >> stephanie: good morning rudeness. >> happy snowden day. >> stephanie: snowden day. >> everybody stay home. >> snowden was the guy in the back of the b-25 who got killed. >> stephanie: good morning rudeness. >> how are you? >> stephanie: i'm good. you wrote a great piece on this and it's interesting. it is not a happy clappy piece but i think it is very honest. might i quote you to you as i want to do? >> please. it's my favorite master batorry activity. >> stephanie: wow. >> whatever floats your boat. >> stephanie: first of all, if you didn't think this was going on you're [ bleep ] blind and stupid. what's important is we know that the order from the fisa court exists. the reality of the surveillance state we exist in. you know it's there.
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what are you going to do about it. chris, you made this point too. rude, you write we live in a post-privacy era. unless you're going to go alex jones unhinged and live off the grid, we're subject to constant intrusion. the rude pundit believes he's being monitored all the time. someone will have access to his e-mails, texts his movements can be tracked by cameras and satellites. every time he uses his ez-pass someone knows where he is. he accepts that as part of daily life in the 21st century. obviously, you want to say a lot more. but chris was talking about it. has that been part of this? whether you start with reality shows and all of the kids are on social media and everyone is sharing everything all the time. that's ultimately why this is not a big deal to us? >> well, it is one reason why i think definitely with the phone calls part of it, i think most people -- a lot of people reacted like yeah and -- i sort of assumed that. which is very sad to me that we
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all just sort of assumed this. i think it was ross in "the new york times" yesterday wrote this thing saying okay, you can have privacy or you can have the internet. you know. this is the trade-off. >> nothing is private on the internet. >> exactly. >> so to me, one of the bigger questions is how do we exist in this world now and we haven't really come up with a way of saying all right what does all of this mean? the idea of the surveillance date has gotten ahead of any kind of -- i don't know, theory of how we live in a post-privacy world. and it is wrestled with in a lot of ways like on facebook and you know, when you get pissed off at somebody who posts every five minutes on facebook or twitter what they're eating. >> stephanie: yeah. >> so is this more -- >> it is orwell with a --
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>> stephanie: you know, rude. essentially, the point of your piece is just whatever side of this you're on, it's not going to change. you go on to say what the obama administration did was completely legal. it was completely legal because the majority nation doesn't care about the vast array of powers under the patriot act. we agreed to this. this is the patriot act. there will be no outcry or outrage. there will be a democratic apologist for the president that would be me, defending his actions, republicans divided into two camps clownish, hypocrites hypocrites who condemn obama when they defended george w. bush for doing the same thing without court approval and hawks who don't give a -- and we would have the bleep button at the ready. how many rights are tamped or the -- trampled on the uneasy alliance of those scared by the confirmation of the secret surveillance of all of us. so it really is -- i mean, that's it. it doesn't matter what side you're on, right?
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there are some surprising bedfellows in this. >> right. this is not going to go -- this is not going to go away. it exists. you're not putting -- you know, you're not putting the horse back in the stable or the ship back in the port. it has just happened. now we need to wrestle with it. because there simply is no courage to -- i don't know if you could, at this point say we're going to just stop this. i don't think it can. i think the only things that really can -- the good that i hope will come of this is that the secrecy behind it will finally be unveiled. the existence of if has been unveiled and that the secrecy of a great deal of it will go away. i don't think we need secrecy -- there are things that can be kept secret but we need to know what's being done with our information. >> stephanie: right. you know what? i'll cop to it. i was saying this to my friend yesterday. we were like horchest, if this were -- honest if this were
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george w. bush, would we be going crazy? maybe. chris made a cogent point part of that was without warrants, without fisa approval. there is enough hypocrisy to go around on this issue. you write that rude pundit doesn't fall into any of the camps. once the patriot act was passed, the -- [ bleep ] i don't think i can say that. was popped. it is a sex thing. >> it is a fruit that hangs on a tree. it is a great pie. >> stephanie: you can't un[ bleep ] the deflowered virgin. as soon as communication shifted from typed letters to whatever floats through the intertubes, communication shifted. massive options in new technology changes human beings relationship with the world whether it is other types of media or cell phones changing how we speak and write to each other. it often takes a generation or two before we figure out how
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technology is transformed. just in time for the new technology to change things again, of course. exactly. that's why i stopped at eight tracks. you know what? you're going to change it in a second. >> right. sometimes it's corporations all of a sudden getting screwed over by their own changes in technology. when we shifted from albums and cassettes to cds when everything became digital that opened up the floodgates for the sharing of digital entertainment and we had the rise of things like napster and so that was corporations changing things technology and then people learning how to adopt that and use it to their own purposes. >> stephanie: one of the most interesting sentences i've heard about this. we need a new is sociological and linguistic paradigm in this post-privacy era. as you go on to say no president is going to give back the powers
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granted to george w. bush. if you're scared obama has them, well [ bleep ] a bunch of us warned you that bush wasn't going to be president forever. that's exactly right. so here we are right? democrats and republicans have re-authorized this. >> that's right. now we need to figure out okay, now how does this change our relationship -- what does this mean for the relationship between the citizen and the government. that it is simply -- it is as easy as the push of a button or typing a few keys that you can find out tons of information about somebody. what does that mean? how do we -- how do we exist and how do we make some kind of new social contract with the government that can help us exist in this world? >> stephanie: well you know, we've been talking about reopening the debate on the patriot act. even if the patriot act were through some miracle overturned, it is too late. the web of surveillance has been put in place. you can bet its future legality has already been set up. you is aty is a frightening thought that our responsibility
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as citizens not to re-claim our lost privacy. what revolution will accomplish that. it ain't gonna happen. it is sad frustrating and exhausting and enervating. the bowl has sailed -- the boat has sailed, maybe never returning to port. that's pretty honest. what we're left with is electing people who we believe will be wise shepherds of this power to invade our prisere is i whenever they work to protect us from terrorists. i mean, it goes to what the president said. you can't have 100% security and 100% privacy. >> right. but we can also -- we can also know what's going on. and that's the thing i think that -- people that are angry about this are angry because we want to know what we agreed to. what was in the fine print of the contract? >> stephanie: right. which michael moore movie was it in when he said have you read the patriot act? they're like no, we don't read the bills. >> read them? what? >> we've got people for that.
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>> stephanie: yeah. the other thing i was saying, the rand pauls of the world. he's just going to try to -- it doesn't matter what hypocrisy he will try everything together. i.r.s., it is all obama overreach or whatever. whatever nefarious -- >> everything is an obama overreach but you know, you don't want to say agree with rand paul but again, i don't know that i agree -- there is certainly something frightening about the idea that they're just storing what is it i heard about that utah facility you mentioned, it can store a trillion dvds worth of information. and which i bet would reach from here to the moon a few times. >> yes. >> but you know, that they're collecting this and storing it for some purpose in the future. and you know, how comfortable are you with that? and can we have a debate about okay, what do you get to do with that material? how long do you get to keep it? do you get to keep it forever?
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i mean, you know, how many times do you get to search it? there's all kinds of things. but i think we have a right to know because it is our information. you know, even if we don't have an expectation of privacy. we at least should be able -- >> should be able to access it. >> we should know the rule. >> stephanie: i love how you shot down the i.r.s. nonscandal in one line. congress hears from conservative groups who were forced by jackbooted i.r.s. thugs to fill out forms. that's really what this is about, right? >> it is. >> stephanie: i had to fill out too many forms. [ crying ] >> all of the sad people at that hearing talking about how they were forceed to fill out forms that they had 20 days to fill out after waiting for the i.r.s. to send them something. >> none of these people have ever bought a house. >> stephanie: right. and again you know, here we go. none of them were denied tax-exempt status except for one liberal group. that's the whole there right?
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>> then there's the thing that came out saying one of the people in this cincinnati office said yeah, i'm the one who ordered it. i said look at tea party and look at patriot because you know what? that's where you belong. >> stephanie: common sense because there are a zillion of these groups after citizens united. most are doing political activity. >> i love these groups that say we're doing political activity but oh no, please don't investigate us for doing political activity. >> stephanie: right. exactly. rudeness, great stuff as usual. and i hope you enjoyed the exercise of me reading your column to you. >> i don't think i can say what happened while i'm on the radio. >> stephanie: it must be shared with the world it's just that good. [ ♪ magic wand ♪ ] rudeness, love you. >> now go clean up. >> stephanie: exactly. i read the part about obama apologist which would be me. hey. skipped over the parts i don't like. >> this one is a tough one. >> stephanie: 47 minutes after the hour.
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right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> ladies and gentlemen, prepare yourselves for a shock. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show."
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♪ to the left, to the left ♪ ♪ you must not know about stephanie miller ♪ ♪ you must not know about stephanie miller ♪ ♪ to the left to the left ♪ >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." welcome to it. 52 minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. elaine in new mexico thinks i'm not far enough to the left. hello, elaine. welcome. >> caller: i think you're what?
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>> stephanie: i'm not far enough to the left, right? on this issue? >> caller: well, i think you were during the bush administration which i appreciated. and i now know it's because you trust obama. there's three things. >> stephanie: elaine, i don't know if you heard rude pundit interview. i think i understand the hypocrisies on all sides of this. i think he's right, don't you? this ship to some degree has sailed. i don't know what we can do about it. >> caller: i heard the entire interview. i don't take that view. i think rude pundit -- i really love the rude pun duty by -- pundit but i think this can be curbed to some extent. and one of the big things about this, chris said it. court is look at it, that's all i care about. i agree. i want a court to be look at it. the fisa court is a rubber stamp for the government. i think maybe there's one in a
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sense of a time when they turned down the government and when you go to that court, the government is the only one arguing. there's no one arguing on the other side. that's an issue that the fisa court is a rubber stamp for the government. but you know, that's the only thing we have. another issue is everybody keeps saying it is legal. it's legal it's legal. there was a very well-known, trusted democratic president franklin roosevelt who interned the japanese. that was all legal. the supreme court ruled that the internment of the japanese was legal. >> stephanie: you know, elaine, i take your point. sometimes things that are legal are not necessarily morally right. look, you can see how our show breaks down. jim has more of a mistrust of government period. i think you're right. i am -- to me, it depends on who's running the government. when the republicans say, you know fema doesn't work, no, it didn't work under george w. bush. >> caller: exactly. i'm not making that argument. it really bugs me that rand paul and all of the other people are trying to roll this into the
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i.r.s. and -- >> that's insane. >> caller: insane. he's not what the point is. and because basically i mean obviously i'm a leftist. the other thing that's really scary about this is that everybody -- also to the legality is that the aclu for years has been trying to challenge this in court. and every time they get to a point to basically challenge the constitutionality of it because even though it's legal some people don't think it is constitutional. they have gone to court. the obama administration has blocked it because of secrecy basically a classified, we can't tell you who or why. so basically, if they're so sure it is legal and constitutional and i understand. things are classified. there's classified information. we don't want to give away secrets but it is not true we've actually had a debate, even a legal debate about whether -- if it's continually being blocked because the information is secret and classified and blah,
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blah blah. so we need -- >> sometimes it is embarrassing. >> caller: exactly. i just -- >> stephanie: you know what it is elaine, because chris has said before, well, they see information meaning the president obviously isn't -- >> security briefings that would make your hair stand on end. >> stephanie: yet you go because we don't we don't know. for instance, this prism they're saying how foiled this new york city terrorist attack. well, you know, documents are showing maybe. maybe not. you know what i mean? >> there are other people that are -- ron wyden and you know, there are other senators that have access to all of that secret information. and they have access to all of the secrecy. they know everything the program is doing and they still have really serious doubts about it. >> stephanie: that's the thing. when someone like a dianne feinstein says something you're right. it does affect me differently than when louie gohmert says something.
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that's something we can all agree on is louie gohmert is a douche. latest exhibit a. wosh he told a witness who ended her pregnancy after being advised the fetus was brain dead, she should have carried the child to term. >> what's the po ?int. >> stephanie: that louie gomer is the brain dead. that's my point. and also a douche. ♪ little douchebag ♪ ♪ little douchebag ♪ ♪ his name is louie gohmert ♪ ♪ and he don't even try ♪ ♪ he's my little douchebag ♪ ♪ he don't know a whole lot ♪ ♪ he's got his paranoid friends in the house on the floor ♪
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♪ it's crazy because he grew up around lead-based paint ♪ >> i'm not saying louie gohmert is a bad guy ♪ ♪ seems like dumb has been dumbed to death ♪ ♪ he's my little douchebag ♪ ♪ he don't know a whole lot ♪ ♪ he's my little douchebag ♪ >> stephanie: thank you rocky mountain mike. all right eric boehlert from media matters for america coming up. we'll ask him about what his take on this stuff and much more. peter page, you remember from curious folk is coproducing with jennifer lopez, the new serious the fosters which sounds fascinating. he will be live in studio with us for hour number three. right back on "the stephanie miller show."
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[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: all right. current television hour number two. jacki schechner. let's go to some happy clappy news. thanks to obamacare major insures have to give back $36 million to california small businesses. >> is this part of the medical lost ratio 80/20 or 85/15? >> stephanie: on tuesday golden state small businesses and their employees got great news. two of the state's largest insures will have to give them over $36 million in insurance rebates because of obamacare
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consumer protection. look at that. >> it is probably medical lost ratio where there is a certain amount of your premium money that has to be spent on medical care as opposed to marketing p.r. salaries, things like that. >> stephanie: i'm going to mention that to the first small business owners who like to listen to both sides. >> your small business owner. >> stephanie: hello. i'm a small radio business owner and i stumbled across your phone call. here's some information. [ ♪ hypnotic ♪ ] here she is in the current news center, jacki schechner. >> good morning, everybody. nelson mandela remains hospitalized in serious but stable condition. the former south african leader was admitted early saturday in johannesburg for a recurring lung infection. obviously concern due to his age. he's now 94 years old. a local paper says it may be time for the south african people to let him go. footage from april showed mandela silent and unresponsive. the man who became south africa's first black president spent 27 years in prison for his
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fight against apartheid. it was there he contracted tb and has had lung issues ever since. he was a nobel peace prize winner but did retire from public life some years ago. in d.c. today, vice president biden will swear in the new new jersey senator jeff tee aza this afternoon at the capital. governor chris christie chose the state attorney general to sit in until voters can pick a more permanent replacement. president obama is scheduled to deliver remarks later this morning in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the equal pay act. he is also at some point today expected to nominate a new chief white house economist. that man will be jason furman, a long-time adviseert to president who's been key in formulating administration policy on everything from taxes to healthcare reform to how to avoid the fiscal cliff. he earned his ph.d. from harvard and has served with the president since his first election campaign. once confirmed furman will
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replace alan krueger as the head of the white house council on white house advisors. krueger is going back to teaching at princeton. we'll be back with more show for you after the break. the young turks is that were honest. they know that i'm not bsing them for some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know i'm going to be the first one to call them out. cenk on air>> what's unacceptable is how washington continues to screw the middle class over. cenk off air i don't want the middle class taking the brunt of the spending cuts and all the different programs that wind up hurting the middle class. cenk on air you got to go to the local level, the state level and we have to fight hard to make sure they can't buy our politics anymore. cenk off air and they can question if i'm right about that. but i think the audience gets that, i actually mean it. cenk on air 3 trillion dollars in spending cuts! narrator uniquely progressive and always topical the worlds largest online news show is on current tv. cenk off air and i think the audience gets, "this guys to best of his
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>> hard news, no agenda. this is "vanguard". next, only on current tv. >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." 1-800-steph-12 toll free from anywhere. this hour brought to you by wix.com. need a web site? wix has one for you. people do not take you seriously unless you have a great professional-looking web site. am i right? >> that's right. >> stephanie: we live in the intertubes era. you can't have a business without a web site. empower your business with a complete stunning online presence. it is free. seriously, over 30 million people have built their web sites with wix. bringing their businesses
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online. it is completely free, requires no design or coding skills. wix has all of the tools you need. there are hundreds of designer made templates to choose from. lots of choice, variety. hosting is included. all-inclusive. they have a nifty little drag and drop tool, right? customize. express who you are and what your business is all about. manage your online presence in one place. you can manage all of your familiar web services in one place as well. clients will easily find your html five. you don't need to be that snowden guy. it is friendly. it will help you grow your business. a lot of people don't have a huge budget for a web site. particularly if you have a small business wix can help you. check it out now. wix.com. it is time for our monday friend, eric boehlert from media matters. eric boehlert from media matters for america doing the lord's work as usual. ♪ hurts so good, come on, baby, eric boehlert hurts so good ♪ >> stephanie: let's dive into
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the right-wing world. >> i don't know what that means. >> stephanie: eric boehlert from media matters who we love. good morning eric boehlert. let's get your thoughts on the nsa thing right out of the box because it is a lot to clue on, isn't it? >> it is. it is. it seems to have sort of knocked everything off the radar. you know, i think the major question is has the program expanded dramatically from the past and under previous years. is this basically a run away train where no one stops? originally, let's sort of listen in. let's keep track of people who talk to -- people overseas who we have concerns about or incoming communications from overseas. now it just seems to be everyone -- everyone is game. all of the telecoms are in. and again but you know, i think there has been some bad reporting and wiretapping from what i understand. they're not reading e-mails. but it is collecting all of the
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data, pretty much at will. 30 -- something like 30,000 fisa requests since it was created and that fisa court was created in the late '70s. something like 12 have ever been denied. it raises all kinds of questions and glen greenwald who i wrote about in my book, bloggers on the bus, who was a cornerstone of the growth of the liberal blogosphere and the net roots you know, at the center of this. and is changing the news cycle. basically changed the way -- he completely changed the liberal blogosphere. he was this unhappy underchallenged, constitutional lawyer living in new york city, one day he said i'm going to start a blog. within six months, he was really -- this was like in 2006, 2005 or 2006. within six months, he was the most important liberal blogger in america. and people understand that now
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who are just now beginning to read him. read his reporting. he is an incredibly diligent and smart guy. anyone who saw him on abc's "this week" over the wheekd, it was an amazing interview that he gave. it is interesting. it is sort of great to see you know, a liberal blogger who is now much more than that. he's a columnist for the guardian but really show how reporting can be done. >> stephanie: yeah, which if you've been watching fox news, you forget. by the way you know, i always think this is my imagination when i watch the sunday shows. you tweeted since 2010, only three dems have been among the 2012 most freak sunday morning guests. i always think it is my imagination but it's not. >> it's. >> no the weird part is the new york times did this piece yesterday basically why is john mccain on every sunday which everyone has been asking for years. then they did this graph this graphic of like all of the
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senators who have been on and if you look at it, yes only three of the last 12 most frequent senator guests since 2010 but "the new york times" didn't even mention that. they didn't even think it was unusual. they didn't even think to have this three four to one imbalance. they didn't think that was odd. but you know, the real story about the sunday morning talk shows is why -- a place for republicans to disseminate their talking points much more so than democrats. another quick point media matters has been covering this for years. and when bush was in the white house and media matters counted up all of the guests, and it was overwhelmingly republican, the sunday morning talk show host said well, of course, there's a republican in the white house. we want to have all of the top officials and now the script is flipped. there is a democrat in the white house. and there are still more republicans on the sunday shows. they say that's more newsworthy.
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we want to hear the critics of the administration. you can't have it both ways here folks. >> stephanie: exactly. by the way you know, as we've been talking about this whole nsa thing, they're clearly -- as we've been talking about this whole nsa thing you know i love the point you made. if you're not do, anything wrong, don't worry. why won't gun -- law-abiding gun owners do the same? >> the claim is tyranny. the government will know who has guns and will know where we are. the government is encroaching on our everyday life. but by the way you know, if you don't sign off on the patriot act, you're a traitor. that was the talking point ten years ago. so right. why does government -- you know, following your every electronic communication, why is that okay if you have nothing to hide? but you know, people won't even sign up their guns.
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either the government is evil and the government is going to destroy all liberty or they should be able to track all of our communications. you can't have it both ways. >> stephanie: the name of keeping you safe and meanwhile, look at this latest in santa monica. becomes like uh, that's the worst part. another shooting rampage. >> it is only five. >> only five. >> hardly newsworthy if it is only five. >> tweeted sarcastically. i'm so old i remember when a shooting rampage was the top story on my twitter feed. it really wasn't. it was oh, by the way, all of the people are dead in the streets of santa monica. i've been tweeting about you know just these rash of accidental shootings usually involving young kids, usually involving unguarded arms. again, these are people who don't want to register guns or have child locks. they don't want to have punishment for kids who find guns. but oh, by the way yeah, sure,
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the government should be able to monitor all of our electronic communications. you know, it is like pick a side here, ya know? and you just said to keep america safe. that's why they should be able to have all surveillance. 30,000 americans die every year from guns. if you're interested in people -- keeping people safe, you might want to look at that. >> stephanie: by the way you know, this is -- you know, the usual, i'm reading the details of the santa monica thing. he was armed with a similar type of the ar-15. he could have fired up to 1300 rounds. he possessed multiple loaded magazines. he had dropped a large bag which contained additional loaded magazines, a handgun, blah blah blah. it is the same thing. the type meant the suspect could have fired up to 1300 rounds had he not been stopped. >> i think he read he had a mental history problem. surprise! people who aren't all there love ar-15s when they decide they
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want to go take revenge on people. it is the same old story. the literal sense. and the depressing sense. >> stephanie: bit way your other tweet. we caught that as well. romney saying i wish hurricane sandy hadn't hit a week before the election. he really at some point needs to stop talking, doesn't he? >> he does. >> stephanie: not that it shouldn't have happened at all. >> he does know 138 people died, right? but in mitt romney's mind, the hurricane sandy will always be about how it affected my campaign. how it affected the electoral turnout. the east coast still has not dug out from it. it is incredibly insensitive. he had like an hour-long interview with neil cavuto. he's got his blazer and his dress shirt. probably in his -- just got off his car elevator. just stop! just go away! if you are going to come back, don't pretend everything is about you.
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and leave the poor people of new jersey and staten island out of it. >> stephanie: i love your piece. fox's war on women gains momentum with susan rice's appointment. by national security adviser dismissed as obama's human shield. >> that was really crazy. so the talking point last week, massive freakout, he appointed susan rice because they can't obstruct it so they can't stop it. people on fox yelled and screamed about benghazi all day. but sean hannity was talking about the only reason she was appointed is because she's a woman. and he doesn't -- that means republicans won't attack her and andrea tan toro went further saying that susan rice was his human shield. and that they use these women to deflect criticism. a, you know, republicans weren't shy about smearing and attacking susan rice last november and december when people thought she might be secretary of state.
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>> stephanie: right. >> in fact, they seemed to be overly excited about smearing and attacking a powerful woman. and so that doesn't work. and b, you know, look at her resume. rhodes scholar youngest ever under secretary of state. u.n. ambassador and now the national security adviser. she's the puppet? she's this woman who is wandering around the west wing and obama said her? make her a national security? the misogyny and the hatred is really kind of creepy. i mean i expected to freak out benghazi benghazi, benghazi. even i was taken aback he picked her because she's a would. >> stephanie: if you can be surprised at fox -- [ ♪ magic wand ♪ ] still a magical new day for you eric boehlert. great stuff as always. we'll talk to you next week. thanks eric. >> wow. he was already out the door. >> running away from the phone.
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>> stephanie: men just cannot get away from me fast enough. 17 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> announcer: i got her number off the men's room stall. 1-800-steph-12.
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an american jihadi. next. ♪ i'm too sexy for my shirt ♪ ♪ so sexy, yes ♪ >> stephanie miller. ♪ you know what i mean and i do my little turn on the cat walk ♪ ♪ yeah, on the catwalk, on the catwalk ♪ ♪ i do my little turn on the catwalk ♪ >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." welcome to it. 22 minutes after the hour.
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1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. mikey in california, you're on the "the stephanie miller show." hi mikey. hello. >> caller: hello! happy gay day. >> stephanie: thank you. >> caller: it ends in y right? i was wondering you know this is my president. hello. but i think the problem is that we're not thinking about the next president. >> stephanie: yeah. this is what rude pundit was saying. people like him were screaming about it during the bush administration. guess what, he won't be president forever. that's the problem right? is the patriot act. >> exactly. i've been throwing pcs since maybe the second bush presidency. but i think what most concerns
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me is that we're not concerned. >> stephanie: we just can't get excited about apathy. jim has -- this was the piece by daniel ellsberg from "the washington post." >> there was a period after the vietnam war partly due due to watergate that made people less tolerant of being lied to, much more aware of how often they were being lied to and how the system operated to make the lying possible without accountability. we got the freedom of information act the fisa court was set up, the nra was forbid of doing hearings. but 40 years have passed, after 9-11 in tick larm, all of the lessons have been lost. it has been a great tolerance magic words of national security or the new words homeland security are invoked congress has given the president free hand in deciding what information they'll know as well as the public. why count on the current court with its current makeup of making the same ruling with the pentagon papers as they did 40 years ago. i'm sure president obama would have been sought a life sentence
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in my case. things unconstitutional then have been put in the about the's hands now. he's an elected monarch. nixon's slogan when the president says it is not illegal. powers that no previous president had. abilities on surveillance that no country in history of the world has ever had. >> stephanie: um, we were talking about, for instance, representative mike rogers republican. he's on the house -- chairman of the house intelligence committee. >> dangerous to us. it is dangerous to our national security and it violates the oath of which that person took. i think they should be prosecuted. >> stephanie: you know this goes to, again depending on what side of the aisle you're on when somebody says something, he was the one last week that said the program has -- prism had helped stop a major terror attack in recent years. he was talking about the guy that was going to attack the new york city subway station in 2009. [ ♪ "nbc nightly news" ♪ ] but legal documents from his case are casting doubts on the claims. the computers seized during an earlier raid and the british authorities and fbi agents.
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access to an e-mail account. his name, later e-mailed for a bomb recipe meaning prism's comprehensive surveillance would have been unnecessary. "buzzfeed" wrote old-fashioned police work not data mining is the tool that led agents to arrest displrks azi. this is the investigation made possible by ordinary warrants under fisa. authorities appear to have been monitoring the pakistani e-mail account linked to terrorists earlier that year. that goes back to the whole debate. how do you fight a war against a tactic. all right. senator mark udall democrat of colorado. >> the fact that every call i make to my friends to my family is noted where i am, the length of it, the date, that concerns me. particularly because americans didn't know this. that's why i'm calling for reopening the patriot act. >> good. good good, good. somebody needed to. >> stephanie: rob in wisconsin, you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi rob. >> caller: hi, stephanie.
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i think that he's a hero but it is sad that what he did, he could go to life in prison for. but what the government did is completely legal. i think that's what's wrong with this. >> stephanie: right. well i think -- of course i don't know what you think but according to rude, i don't think anything's going to happen with the patriot act. it should be discussed and fixed but will it? probably not. senator jeff merkley democrat of oregon on this subject as well. >> i would like to know how the president feels that my cell phone calls and your cell phone calls are relevant to an investigation. what investigation? what act or what threat? >> stephanie: sam in jacksonville, you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi sam. >> caller: hi, stephanie, how are you? >> stephanie: good. go ahead. >> caller: there were a couple of things about this spying thing. one that the guy didn't work for nsa. he worked for a private contractor.
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which is way too many in our government to begin with. the only other thing that really bothered me was i read somewhere this weekend that you know, people are using it to spy on their ex-wives and things like that. when you talk about maybe presidential candidates or something like that if you get a partisan person in there that's going to dig up dirt, that's just not fair. we don't want it on our side and they don't want it on their side. so, you know, this thing needs strict overview and it needs to get out of private contractor's hands and be part of a responsible government service. >> stephanie: we were talking about this guy earlier sam. it is a little scary. high school dropout. didn't finish computer training at community college. how did he get access? >> we need to depend less on independent contractors for stuff like this. >> well, yeah. and also the private prisons are scary, too. >> that's a whole other topic. >> write laws to get more
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clients. >> and make more money if they put more people in prison. >> stephanie: kevin in d.c. go ahead. >> caller: good morning, lovey. gotta correct you on one thing. you said men can't get away from you quickly. there's one man who can't get quickly enough to you. >> stephanie: that's right. >> caller: i have a problem with this as well. i just wanted everyone to remember that real life is not like an aaron sorkin fantasy. republicans are never going to have a changes of heart. everything that has been pleasured the last few years they immediately take away. there is at least a chance to reverse this under democrats there's no chance under republicans. do you want everything that you've loved the past few years to go away. you make this one issue give the psychopaths back control of every seat of the house. in the senate, in the presidency. >> stephanie: i hear you honey. 29 minutes after the hour. right back here on "the stephanie miller show."
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young turks! i think the number 1 thing than viewers like about the young turks is that were honest. they know that i'm not bsing them for some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know i'm going to be the first one to call them out. cenk on air>> what's unacceptable is how washington continues to screw the middle class over. cenk off air i don't want the middle class taking the brunt of the spending cuts and all the different programs that wind up hurting the middle class. cenk on air you got to go to the local level, the state level and we have to fight hard to make sure they can't buy our politics anymore. cenk off air and they can question if i'm right about that. but i think the audience gets that, i actually mean it. cenk on air 3 trillion dollars in spending cuts! narrator uniquely progressive and always topical the worlds largest online news show is on current tv. cenk off air and i think the audience gets, "this guys to best of his abilities is trying to look out for us." only on current tv!
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this show is about analyzing criticizing, and holding policy to the fire. are you encouraged by what you heard the president say the other night? is this personal, or is it political? a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i'm given to doing anyway, by staying in touch with everything that is going on politically and putting my own nuance on it. in reality it's not like they actually care. this is purely about political grandstanding. i've worn lots of hats, but i've always kept this going. i've been doing politics now for a dozen years. (vo) he's been called the epic politics man. he's michael shure and his arena is the war room. >> these republicans in congress that think the world ends at the atlantic ocean border and pacific ocean border. the bloggers and the people that are sort of compiling the best of the day. i do a lot of looking at those people as well. not only does senator rubio just care about rich people, but somehow he thinks raising the minimum wage is a bad idea for the middle class. but we do care about them right?
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>> i'll admit, there are dark, sorted little corners of internet where the name stephanie miller is whispered in hush tones. >> stephanie: yeah. it is "the stephanie miller show." welcome to it. 34 minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. let's invite jacki to the party wanna? ♪ hello world, there's a new -- come on get jacki ♪ >> good morning. >> stephanie: first of all little tiny corner before we go back to you. so you were right. it is 80/20 rule in obamacare
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that major insurers have to give back $36 million to california small businesses. thank you jacki schechner for getting us the affordable care act. >> that's the nice part that the insurance companies are going to be mandated to spend your premium dollars on actual medical care. imagine that. >> stephanie: it forces them to spend 80% of the premiums on paying for medical services rather than overhead or profits. that means less money for profitable insurance companies. yeah. >> big yeah. >> stephanie: by the way the so-called 80/20 rule has put $1.5 billion back into american pockets. >> sort of infuriating they've been getting away with this all along. but nice to know we made a change. >> stephanie: your thoughts on -- you want to chime in on the nsa thing. >> well, this probably is going to get me into a lot of trouble. i have a little bit of an wish snowden. i watched the interview. i read the articles. i'm just a little concerned by how he went about all of this.
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i'm sort of skeptical and suspicious of somebody who plans to do this for three weeks. lies to his girlfriend. says he doesn't care if he doesn't see his family again. >> stephanie: right. >> takes off for hong kong. >> stephanie: then gets emotional about how this might affect his family. >> yeah. that's all just a little suspicious to me. >> now, a warning? >> a little bit of me likes to make the comparison. this should be very telling. i had to leung his name. i couldn't remember the name of the guy who leaked the 47% video. scott proudy. i had to google it. it was like i remember the 47% video and all of the conversation that started. i don't remember scott's name as easily because he waited awhile to come out because it wasn't about him. it was about the story. and that's why he said he waited so long to reveal his identity. he wanted people to pay attention to the story. if this guy snowden was so concerned about revealing all of this information and having it not be about him why is he sitting down and making a video a couple of days later?
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to me, he's drawing attention away from the content that he's so concerned about to make himself the center of the story. i just wonder what we'll learn about him and his nature and his personality, not that it takes away from the conversation we can and should be having about whether or not this is a big deal. but i just wonder about the motivation behind this. and frankly if you sign up to be a part of the government and you are approved for some sort of security clearance, there are some expectations. >> stephanie: i felt like -- i totally get what you're saying because i felt like stuff like this, for example is a little self-aggrandizing. >> my name is snowden. i'm 29 years old. i work as an infrastructure analyst for nsa in hawaii. i had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal e-mail. >> i want to work for a company that starts with the word booze. >> it is b-o-o-s.
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>> stephanie: your thoughts on that? >> well, the whole thing to me just seems a little self-serving. i just don't understand -- i just don't understand why he's doing this the way he did it and it is just -- i guess it was the tone as i'm watching this and he's talking about i don't know what's next for me. here's what they may do to me and there was a lot of me. it came across to me as incredibly narcissistic and incredibly self-involved. i just think if you're so concerned about the nature of the country and the security nature of the country that perhaps it shouldn't be about you. >> what do you think about my narcissism? >> that's how it came across to me. >> stephanie: well, and you know, not that jim doesn't raise good points, to me, there is a difference between this and meli. jacki, what we were talking to rude pundit about. the fact is this is a debate we should be having but the fact is
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this is the patriot act we all agreed to. republicans and democrats right? >> right. i do think there's something to be said for the fact that this all is happening with congressional approval. this is not news. to the people that we elected. that there are levels of oversight. and make we need to have that -- maybe we need to have that conversation about what we okay and what we don't okay. >> stephanie: people knew this was happening. we didn't know the details. as james clapper said, we don't know the details because you don't want the terrorists to know the details. >> how self-absorbed are you that you think you have the authority to decide what should be public knowledge and what be this security -- should be under lock and key? should be secure? and i think if you have security clearance, there is an assumption that you're entrusted with keeping things private that may need to be private. you know, the guy turns around and says i think the public should decide. have you met the public? i'm not so sure that everybody needs to weigh in on this. i'm pretty sure that there are some people with more knowledge
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of national security than your average guy. and maybe they should be making decisions as to what we need and don't need. i don't believe in absolute government authority by any stretch. >> stephanie: but if i have to choose between president obama and a high school dropout that didn't finish his computer course at community college, i'm going to go with president obama. >> it is an easy choice. >> stephanie: here's the part you were talking about. ed snowden the nsa whistle-blower yesterday. >> i'm just another guy who sits and watches what's happening and goes this is something that's not our place to decide. the public needs to decide whether these programs or policies are right or wrong. >> stephanie: yeah, he does make it sound awfully noble. >> we do elect people to represent us. we don't vote on everything all the time. certainly weigh in with public opinion. we elect elected officials. >> stephanie: senator feinstein or with someone on the other side of the aisle on this, then you know, that's what --
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you call or write them or you -- unelect them if that's how you feel. >> we don't crowd source every vote in this country. we have a process and whether or not you think the process works that's fine. but you don't get to have national security clearance and decide that the public should make this -- like who are you to decide that? i just think that -- >> stephanie: i don't want to draw attention to myself. here i am on television. >> exactly. three days after i leaked this stuff. i don't know. to me, something about it just smells really foul. >> at the beginning of the interview, him wanting to spell it out so the reporters get it right. >> i'm 29 years old. i like long walks in the moonlight. >> i'm at the hotel in hong kong where my bills are running up because i'm getting room service every day. >> stephanie: but i won't be ignored. it is going to go on and on until i get more attention. >> i'm not going to be ignored.
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>> stephanie: jacki schechner good stuff. thank you honey. >> my pleasure. >> stephanie: there she goes. nurse jacki. [ applause ] ken in atlanta you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi ken. >> caller: how you doing? i'm a liberal but i'm taking issue with the nsa. the liberals and the conservatives are paranoid about big government taking over. we've been in -- we've been a country for 300 and some years. we have checks and balances. we had the nixon era. but as the people, the people are the checks and balances. in 1770, our threat was people coming in with shotguns, taking us over. now, we have people who can come into new york with nuclear devices and i mean, this is a technology age. the private companies already have this information. i would rather the government have this than these private industries. we're getting the information from the private industries. >> you can't vote out the koch brothers, for example.
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>> stephanie: right. ken, i think you raise a good point. you bring up nixon. this is what we've been saying about them saying everything is worse than watergate. once again thanks for playing really bad analogies. let's review for historical purposes. [ ♪ "jeopardy" theme ♪ ] president ordered a burglary to get -- information on his enemies. that's totally -- like you say you can agree or disagree with this, this is not something obama ordered. this is the patriot act that we all agreed to. >> although, should point out that ellsberg says the government has used the es podge podge -- espionage act six times. >> stephanie: okay. let's go to gail in sacramento. welcome. >> caller: hi, guys, did we get upset when google decided to film the front of all of our dwellings? >> that's a private company. that's not the government. >> caller: i understand. but i didn't give consent to
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that. did you give consent to that? this is how it gets started. and i'm not happy about this either. i'm a liberal. this makes -- >> stephanie: i freaked out the first time i saw google maps, as well. >> on the street, you do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy. >> no, you don't. no, you don't. if it is not in your body and not in your house, you no longer have -- >> inside your house, you have privacy. >> caller: right. and your body. nobody should be able to invade the inside of your body. >> unless you're at the airport. >> caller: unless it is consented but that's a consent issue. i'm giving consent you to for me to get from point a to point b. consent. if i don't want that, then i don't fly. >> right. >> you have that choice. >> caller: right. exactly. and who didn't know? and this man, are you kidding me? he couldn't find a reporter to out this story for him?
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he had to go to hong kong? he can't be extradited? >> he's in hong kong so that he can't be extradited. >> caller: right. so what is so heroic about evasion of the law. if you're standing on principle then you leave your butt in hawaii until they come. this guy establishes a platform. this is about me, myself and i. and oh, aren't i noble? however, he could have -- are you telling me that rachel maddow would not have taken this story and done a huge piece on it? there's no -- with our free press, if he wanted to get this information out that he could not have done it another way. >> right. >> fly an airplane over. >> stephanie: okay. with a banner. >> people, you know, with some justification are worried about government being too big. i'm more worried about
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corporatism because you can't vote out the koch brothers. talking about the -- where they have an incentive to arrest people. >> and companies don't answer to the american people. they only answer to their shareholders and to their board. >> stephanie: and google max is creepy. >> how is it creepy? >> it is a huge help. when you're -- when you need to go find a place on google maps and -- >> creepy stalkers want to find your house? >> stephanie: exactly. you haven't had my problems. >> they have your address. it is easy to find. >> stephanie: 46 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> it even vibrates like real. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show."
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>> if you believe in state's rights but still support the >> "viewpoint" digs deep into the issues of the day. >> do you think that there is any chance we'll see this president even say the words
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"carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. (vo) she's joy behar. >>current will let me say anything.
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>> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." ♪ love, sex and magic ♪ >> in whatever order. >> magic, sex, love. >> stephanie: 1-800-steph-12 toll free from anywhere. someone is mad at me for something different than my obama apologistness. steph, thanks a lot. i made the mistake of telling the family of cody the screaming dog. every computer was blasting cody's whining. how do i wash that ear worm from my head? you can't. you can't get over cody, the dog that screams like sam ten tennison. >> i don't know why you find that fascinating.
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it is horrifying. >> stephanie: it's funny. eric boehlert made a great point as usual. he was tweeting about the right wing being fine with the nsa snooping but they don't want anyone to have to register a gun ever. and we were talking about this -- the latest in santa monica, friday, the santa monica police chief friday. >> he was armed with a 223 semi-automatic rifle similar in type to an ar-15. he was in possession of multiple loaded magazines a handgun and the upper receiver for an automatic rifle. >> stephanie: the fifth victim just died. santa monica police chief again. >> i would presume any time someone puts a vest of any sort, comes out with a bag full of loaded magazines car jacks folks, goes to a college kills more people and has to be neutralized at the hands of the police, i would say that's premeditated. >> a little bit. >> stephanie: hattie in tennessee, you're on "the stephanie miller show." >> caller: hi, steph. how are you?
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>> stephanie: good. go ahead. >> caller: i don't know if anyone had thought about this. but i think this guy is a plant. i think he's a mole. he has worked for boos and allen for three months. now, i have a background in computer science. i'm retired now and i'm 71 years old. but at one time, for 24 years i worked in computers. but it takes time for you to learn computer systems even private computer systems. and when you think of a computer systems that are as complex as our government, as complex as they can be, as large as the government is, it would be impossible in three months' time, he's only been with boos and allen for three months. three months time for him to grasp that much information. he would have to have been a child prodigy. this guy was a high school
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dropout. and the other thing -- >> stephanie: and didn't finish his computer class at community college? >> no matter what he took at community college -- you know, you can't compare a community college to an i.t.t. or university of illinois. they don't stack up on that same level. the other thing, if he cared so much about the american people, why would he pick up and flee? why would he go to hong kong? why wouldn't he sit right there in hawaii, tell the american people everything that he has given greenwald and wait for them to come pick him up? he ran because he doesn't want to go to jail. he broke the law. >> hong kong has a history of cooperating with american authorities and extraditing criminals. >> caller: that would be great. >> yeah. >> caller: but he also puts the country at a greater risk, too. >> stephanie: that's right. >> caller: picked up by other agents. he could be picked up by the
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chinese. the chinese are already stealing supposedly, our secrets both from corporations as well as from the government. and you know, i don't see him as a hero. >> stephanie: right, did he do more harm or good? that's a fair question, don't you think? >> caller: i don't see him as a hero. i see him as a criminal. all right. christine in cleveland you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi christine welcome. >> caller: good morning, family. >> stephanie: hello. >> caller: how are you? >> stephanie: good. >> caller: yeah, can i be the official woman that doesn't have her panties in a bunch this morning? >> stephanie: all right then. i thought that would be me but okay fine. >> caller: we can talk about that later. mike rogers, the chair of the house intel committee talking about violating this man's oath, this mr. snowman or whatever he is. the hypocrisy is baffling to me because you look at what's going on in congress and it's all the
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shiny objects that you frequently talk about. it is look, look, here's the keys, here's the shiny object. but when it comes to doing the people's work, have they not all violated their oath as far as jobs infrastructure, things that are really pertinent? do you know how many people -- i mean you and i and chris and jim, we're all kind of the newsaholics. >> stephanie: right. >> caller: we look at that and we go okay, we're the newsaholics but those who don't have jobs, including me right now, there's so many more important things. benghazi. and can i quote hillary clinton? it was like what difference does it make at this point? did you not know that this was going to be out there? did you not know that this was going to happen? and when they violate their oath, i mean how about legislation versus investigation? >> stephanie: there you go. ooh, there is a catchphrase for 2014. legislation, not investigation.
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by the way, here is a story about republicans have a problem with young voters. democrats have a problem with young nonvoters. [ ♪ "nbc nightly news" ♪ ] we have to get off our ass. >> stop being lazy and shipless. >> stephanie: interesting story by ronald brounstein, republicans have a problem with young voters. democrats have a problem with young nonvoters. the equation which applyies to voters, could be a strong election in 2016. the bottom line is we're going to have the same kind of just gridlock. i hope that stuff like this gets people off their ass. next year's election could disappoint both democrats and mislead republicans by tempting them to believe they are have overcome the trends that have allowed them to know the vote. it could highlight one of the forces make it difficult for either party to sustain unified
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control over washington even as they struggle to reach consensus on almost anything while power is divided. minority voters turn out in smaller turnouts than the midterms. 2014 will be an older and whiter electorate when they have become the core of the coalition to which i say eek scary! all right. so that was not a happy clappy but hopefully it is a cautionary tale. all right. so we have peter page is on his way into the studio. you remember him from curious folk. he's producing the new jennifer lopez and -- they have created and producing a new show called the fosters. right back on "the stephanie miller show."
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[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: all right. hour number three. actor peter page on his way live in studio with us to talk about his new show. jacki schechner -- >> yes? >> stephanie: a lot of people on the phones backing you up saying they do not see him as a hero. they see him as a criminal. >> well, you know, people are getting a little hyperbolic on twitter. i want to make sure people understand it is tough to say anything definitive right now. my opinions come from a gut instinct and a gut feeling. i think before we all praise this man as a hero we learn more about what he did and why he did it and the decisions he makes surrounding it. >> stephanie: i thought the last caller raised an interesting point about has he done more harm than good? if he cares so much about the american people in terms of intelligence. >> i think it is fair to say time will tell. it is very quick.
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this all came out late thursday night. hasn't even been a week. >> stephanie: jacki schechner in the current news center. >> good morning everybody. we have other news. checks should be in the mail today on their way to tens of thousands of homeowners who face foreclosure after they got robo signed mortgages. five major companies have settled with 49 state attorneys general after the evidence that the institutions robo signed mortgages and never reviewed them. that means people often got loans they couldn't afford and they couldn't pay them back. they put themselves and the lenders at risk. while the banks got bailouts, homeowners got kicked out and were forced into bankruptcy. so now the homeowners are going to get some money from the settlement but the amount that goes to those who filed claims is little consolation. it averaged out to about $1500 a person. that is hardly enough to compensate someone for losing his or her home. tomorrow, the senate is expected to start debate on immigration reform. bipartisan legislation does have
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bipartisan support but a group of conservative republicans are determined to derail the process through excessive amendments. among them, senators ted cruz and jeff sessions. sessions on friday talked about the bill and called it amnesty. >> if that were to pass, the senators voting for it are basically promising the american people giving assurances to the american people that they will end the legality in the future. >> senate majority leader harry reid has said wants to hold a final vote before lawmakers leave for the july 4th recess. president obama is scheduled to give remarks tomorrow on immigration as "new york times" calls it to "set the tone" for the debate. but now it's really all in the hands of those on the hill. we're back with more show for you after the break. stick around. >> if you believe in state's rights but still support the drug war you must be high.
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>> "viewpoint" digs deep into the issues of the day. >> do you think that there is any chance we'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. (vo) next on current tv. vanguard: the documentary series that raised the bar for excellence. >> we dive deep into the topics that we cover. >> telling important stories that need to be told. (vo)and on the next vanguard: >> one of the things that we seek for, is to die as a martyr. (vo) what drove a small town kid to the arms of radical islam? >> it was so preposterous. if you would ever know a person that would become an international terrorist. >> when you see him you don't see the terrorist. you're like, oh hey thats my friend that i haven't seen in a couple years. hi, i'm terry and i have diabetic
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>> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." welcome to it. six minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. why, who is that? why, it's the handsome, romantic, peter page. actor, extraordinaire. now, executive producer, extraordinaire. this is very exciting. congratulations. >> thank you so much. >> thanks for having me. i'm excited to be here. the dirty liberal in me is so happy. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: dirty boy. i had no idea you were such a big mog ul. the new abc family show, the fosters, your show. you created it. >> with my writing partner and jennifer lopez is one of the executive producers. >> stephanie: of j. lo fame.
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>> she's been out promoting the show. having a megaphone like jennifer -- >> stephanie: i'm told she's somewhat high profile. >> her 19 million twitter followers. >> stephanie: we talked about this show, too. i love the whole -- because she sort of said it is based on her experience of having an atypical family. i love the idea. tell us the premise. >> the show is about two moms, a lesbian couple. >> what? [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> two moms. and to make it worse their interracial. >> stephanie: oh, my god. >> even more shocking! >> who have one biological son from one of their previous marriages. >> and one mechanical son? >> no. and two adopted latino twins. one boy, one girl. and then they bring a foster girl in to the home. >> stephanie: this is all so confusing. [ scooby-doo's "huh?" ] when you grow up with ozzy and
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harriet. >> it is just outright filgty. it is this story of this created family. and really, at the end of the day, it is a family drama. that's all it is. it is just a family drama about a non-traditional family. >> stephanie: you've had one airing. off to a great start. we can watch it tonight. >> we premiered last week. did very well. i don't know. we were up 197% from the same window last year. which i don't know what that means. >> stephanie: that was just from focus on the family watching. >> yeah. >> i probably shouldn't say this. but one million moms, they keep sending out the e-mail blasts that say don't watch the fosters. it's on mondays at 9:00, 8:00 central. repeat airing at this time and this time and this time. >> stephanie: please protest. >> you can't ask for better promotion than that. >> do not p.r. the show ever. whatever you do. >> stephanie: really? >> when it went on the air someone took out a full page ad
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that said do not watch queerest folk. if has scenes of anal sex gay men kissing. it was way better than anything we could have gotten. >> stephanie: those poor million moms. first of all there may be a skosh less than a million. >> my understanding is roughly about 500,000. >> fewer zeros. >> it might be one mom in her mom's basement. that's it. >> stephanie: they protested ellen degeneres before and also schweddy balls ice cream. permanently outraged. if you don't like lesbians or schweddy balls, how can we help you? >> we have nothing else to give you. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: you're just persnickety. obviously,s as somebody was
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saying, jennifer lopez says every time we have to push the envelope and be a reflection of what's going on in society and what families really look like. >> see the families around me. that's where the idea came from. my writing partner and i wanted to do a family drama. because there's this dirt of them on the air right now. what story do we want to tell? what story do we see that isn't currently reflected on television? every lesbian couple has kids. let's tell the truth. >> stephanie: some comedian say what is lesbian having kids. that used to be the whole point. didn't you have to have children. what is going on? >> another one of our executive producers, he's a lesbian producer with two kids with her partner. if you do it just do one. one is perfect. i love my kids. they're amazing but two is too many. did is just too many.
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>> stephanie: we get the point. jennifer lopez said you can't keep spoon-feeding the idea of who the perfect family is. i have two kids, their dad marc anthony doesn't live at home with us. they have four stepbrothers and sisters. it is not traditional. i thought her point was actually touching. she said we all wish we had that fairy tale thing in our heads but when it doesn't come true, they shouldn't have to think i don't have the mom dad perfect three kids and the dog. >> that i'm lesser somehow. >> i think a lot of us grew up that way feeling we're not the cleavers. >> brady bunch or nothing. >> somehow we failed. >> even the brady bunch. >> stephanie: someone missed the point of the brady bunch. >> carol brady was divorced. you just didn't talk about that. >> stephanie: you whispered it. >> that's right. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: so the fosters stars terri polo of meet the
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parents. as you were saying, it is an interesting story line. who she plays a police officer who works with her ex-husband. awkward. >> who is partnered with her ex-husband played by danny nucci, titanic. you can see his face. >> exactly. >> stephanie: a lot of this, too, as somebody pointed out is generational. the millennial generation is so much more color-blind. gay is not an issue for them. they're so much more used to people being out. >> fascinating thing. went on the air last week. i've been watching twitter basically obsessively ever since. i just hashtagged the fosters. it has been overwhelmingly positive. i've been astounded. i was expecting a lot more blowback and a lot more criticism. and the generation that really uses twitter they're completely down. i have seen three tweets, i think where people said this is
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disgusting. oh, this is -- i can't believe i got cable again for this filthy, the fosters. or i liked it until that one mom kissed the other mom. >> has there been any problem with it being on abc family which is a little more -- >> but they're not really. the truth is, abc family bought the network from pat robertson. they had to keep the word family in the title for ten years. >> keep running the "700 club." >> stephanie: that made his head explode what family means. >> their tag line is a new kind of family. we came along to make good on it. >> actually, i would have tornadoes. >> stephanie: i did 1,000 years ago show me the funnies on abc family. it became "show me the door" which they did. >> show me my last paycheck. >> stephanie: i have a long checkered history with them.
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lopez says the fosters stands for family is a place for unconditional love to be accepted, feel safe. there's no real normal. it is interesting. one of my best friends is a psychologist. she did her thesis on the myth of normalcy. what's normal? >> i think the sooner we dispense with the idea of normal, the better we all feel in our skin because the truth is, at the end of the day everyone's got something that makes them feel different other outside, less than, worse than, weirder than, whatever it is. >> stephanie: i'm weirder than everybody. >> well, we know that. >> stephanie: okay. [ laughter ] i know people were asking if she's going to be involved at all at some point. >> we're using some of her music. in the first season. so she's been terrific. she may act at some point. we'll see. she's been really clear that she really believes the show doesn't need it. that the show stands on its own which i take as a huge compliment. if the right role and
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opportunity and timing came along, of course we would love to use her. >> there is a slight possibility she might make out with terri polo. >> stephanie: just say maybe. >> why is the table rising? [ laughter ] >> your pants are getting tight. >> stephanie: terri polo makes his teeth sweat. >> have you seen the woman who plays her wife? look her up on the interweb. she's ridiculous. she was on "in treatment" the second season, she was in "rescue me," one of the most breathtakingly beautiful woman in the history of the world. the two of them make a couple that will make your head spin. >> stephanie: jim's pants are entirely too tight now. >> oh, yeah! laugh laugh. >> stephanie: have you ever thought of changing the name of the show to "damn."
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>> the kids are also beautiful too. this beautiful girl named maya mitchell. latino twins, jake and sierra ramirez. it is basically like the family brought to you by benetton. >> stephanie: how did this come about? i'm curious with jennifer. her story line fits in so well. how did that all happen? >> a friend of my writing partner's and mine, somebody we had developed some feature film projects with moved over to a company and was working in development with her and he said you guys were looking for good tv stuff. you guys should come in. we pitched this to them. they said well, why is this a jennifer lopez project? what does this have to do with jennifer? we said well, this is about the 21st century multicultural family. we think jennifer is the first multicultural superstar. they said sold! we were off and running. >> stephanie: wow, the
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time-worn hollywood tradition of ass-kissing and you were obviously spectacular at it. >> i beg your pardon. >> negotiating. >> stephanie: you also say that -- in this article, she does not sit there being gorgeous. she's involved. >> the whole company is. they've been terrific. >> stephanie: casting and everything. >> yes. casting and they are active participants in the development of the fosters. >> stephanie: the only tragedy in this whole thing is that your handsome, romantic face has moved behind the camera. [ ♪ magic wand ♪ ] not in front of the camera. >> i'm leaning on my first. with a sideways glance. >> you're a pro at it. >> i really -- i really love this. i really love this work. and it feels like a clearer expression of what i was always meant to be doing. acting sort of tortures me. the whole time, i'm sort of agonized by it. this is a much harder job but a much easier job for me. >> stephanie: cute how you made that scene like workin' in
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a coal mine. [ ♪ magic wand ♪ ] >> i literally met someone who works in a coal mine yesterday. that's a true story. >> wow. >> stephanie: did you compare war stories? >> you know hal sparks. i'm just sayin'. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: i have no comment. right back with more peter paige live in studio on "the stephanie miller show." >> i'm kind of known for having a twisted sense of humor. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." >> jack, how old are you? >> nine. >> this is what 27 tons of marijuana looks like. (vo) with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines, way inside. (vo) from the underworld, to the world of privilege. >> everyone in michael jackson's life was out to use him. (vo) no one brings you more documentaries that are real, gripping, current.
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you know who is coming on to me now? you know the kind of guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those types are now. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. you would rather deal with ahmadinejad than me. >>absolutely. >> and so would mitt romney. (vo) she's joy behar. >>and the best part is that current will let me say anything. what the hell were they thinking?
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(vo) it's the documentary series that raised the bar for excellence. and on the next vanguard: >> we're waiting for the enemy to come, and try to kill as many of them as we can. small town kid to become an american jihadi. next.
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♪ people don't you know it's about time ♪ >> stephanie: this is "the stephanie miller show." this hour brought to you by big commerce. these days, having an online store vital to building a successful business. the internet, of course, where people buy products every day. i know i do. if you have a business and you're not selling online, you're a dufus. what you need to do is get big commerce. it is the all in one easy solution for online businesses. they'll help you build your online store fast. you get customizable web site design, shopping cart features, credit card and payment options with marketing tools and optimize searches. it has everything you need including expert customer support reps ready to walk you through every step of the way. we highly recommend big commerce here at the "the stephanie miller show." use my name to get you started with this special offer.
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a 30-day free trial plus two hours of personalized ecommerce coaching free. click on the little blue headphones at the top of the home page on bigcommerce.com. select stephanie from the drop down menu. remember, big commerce.com. click on the blue headphones and type in stephanie. i'm slobbering over him literally. peter paige actor extraordinaire who is now executive producer, show creator of the fosters on the abc family television network. it airs tonight on 9:00 p.m. >> 9:00, 8:00 central unless you have directv and you're on the west coast, you have to watch it at 6:00 or 7:00. >> stephanie: you gave us a tv fun fact. >> if you dvr a show and you watch it and you fast forward through the commercials, your viewing does not count toward ratings. if you don't watch the commercials, they don't care that you watched it. so if you love a show, watch the
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commercials. isn't that -- i was fascinated. i just learned that last week. >> stephanie: people know that who watch me here on the current tv network. who is our biggest star? the ear vac guy. >> ow! >> stephanie: wax vac guy. >> john fuglesang knows him. >> stephanie: he is revered here as the deity that he is. >> the crinkly hose. we wonder how the auditions went. ow! >> stephanie: too much, too much. >> i will never give up my q-tips. my favorite moment of the day. my single favorite moment of the day is sticking a q-tip in my ear. >> stephanie: you're a weird dude. >> no doubt about it. >> just don't have any pets around that jump on you while you're doing it. i know it's dangerous and it is not good for me. because some people smoke. i like -- >> stephanie: what a sad sad little man you are. [ laughter ]
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>> there are a lot of nerves in there. >> stephanie: talking about the nsa whistle-blower all morning. kristin yankton said i agree with you google maps is creepy. too stalkerrish. then again if you're not doing anything wrong, you have nothing to fear about google and paparazzi getting photos of your personal life. it is not like companies weren't collecting our info. chris yankton. thank you chris. what do you think of this whole thing? >> i was listening to you guys as i was driving in. i mean i certainly understand the case -- who is the woman who you were talking to earlier? >> one of the callers? >> no. >> jacki schechner. >> stephanie: our newswoman. >> we all know -- we all knew when we signed up for the patriot act -- >> i didn't. >> this was part of the thing. >> stephanie: not jim. not russ feingold.
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>> but at the same time, i do think there's value in having this conversation. and if it takes you know, a guy with a little bit of a several serving ego to zip off to hong kong and have us all talk about it, maybe that's an important thing. >> there's some things that do need to remain secret. there are other things we need to know about. for example, the guy in the helicopter striking all of these people thinking they were enemy combatants and they were all civilians including first responder. we need to know what's being done with our tax dollars. >> agreed. i can't argue that. i do find it pretty terrifying that in the name of convenience americans will swallow almost anything. if you don't get in the way of me getting to the mall, i will -- i'm down for kind of whatever is -- >> stephanie: it is hard for us to get excited regarding this whole thing. very liberal friend yesterday said yeah.
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i don't really care about this. i don't know. i was saying this is what the president said yesterday that i think -- >> obama: you can't have 100% security and also then have 100% privacy and zero inconvenience. >> stephanie: i love when people say oh, was it just because you trust obama more than george w. bush? i'm like yes. got me! [ laughter ] >> i do! >> stephanie: yep. by the way other current obsession besides cody, the dog that screams is behind the candelabra. don't mean to ask you about all things gay. >> the tonys. it was gay pride yesterday. i mean, i'm ready. >> stephanie: all right. behind the candelabra. >> i loved it. i loved michael douglas' man breasts. i loved rob lowe's strange
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face-lift. one eye that didn't -- put you on the hollywood diet. my favorite one was when michael douglas pulls out the portrait of himself and says i want him to look like this. just astounding. >> stephanie: when he comes in the white cast, i'm sorry i'm so informal. >> or standing all over the stage in this huge feathered cape. my mother told me she didn't like it but do you like it? you paid for it. [ laughter ] just astounding. >> i wish my brother george was here. >> stephanie: back with more peter paige live in studio on "the stephanie miller show." vanguard: the documentary series that raised the bar for excellence. >> we dive deep into the topics that we cover. >> telling important stories that need to be told. (vo)and on the next vanguard: >> one of the things that we seek for, is to die as a martyr. (vo) what drove a small town kid
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to the arms of radical islam? >> it was so preposterous. if you would ever know a person that would become an international terrorist. >> when you see him you don't see the terrorist. you're like, oh hey thats my friend that i haven't seen in a couple years.
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criticizing, and holding policy to the fire. are you encouraged by what you heard the president say the other night? is this personal, or is it political? a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i'm given to doing anyway, by staying in touch with everything that is going on politically and putting my own nuance on it.
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in reality it's not like they actually care. this is purely about political grandstanding. i've worn lots of hats, but i've always kept this going. i've been doing politics now for a dozen years. (vo) he's been called the epic politics man. he's michael shure and his arena is the war room. >> these republicans in congress that think the world ends at the atlantic ocean border and pacific ocean border. the bloggers and the people that are sort of compiling the best of the day. i do a lot of looking at those people as well. not only does senator rubio just care about rich people, but somehow he thinks raising the minimum wage is a bad idea for the middle class. but we do care about them right?
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>> is it cold in here or is it just that i'm not wearing any underwear? >> stephanie: it is the "the stephanie miller show." >> what was that from? >> stephanie: actor director peter paige with us. marcel is on the line. >> caller: i'm calling you because i'm a whistle-blower and i belong to an association called the international association of whistle-blowers. we're the only association for and by whistle-blowers in the country. >> stephanie: what do you blow the whistle on? >> i blew the whistle on fraud in an organization, a nonprofit organization and my life was put at risk. it was really horrible what happened to me. and there are a group of us, you know, we don't make a lot of money.
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we don't hit the television set. nobody knows about us. naively, we believe that if you tell the truth that's sufficient. only to find out that telling the truth set you free but no one ever finishes the sentence. what it will set you free of is your personal reputation. all of your personal belongings and in rare cases your very life. >> stephanie: what is your take on the ed stone case in particular? >> i think for this conversation to occur there needed to be someone who brought it up and the only reason we're talking about it today is because he leaked this information to the press. >> stephanie: marcel not every whistle blowing case is the same, wouldn't you have to admit? you can't just say it's okay to leak classified information that impacts national security, can you and say that's the same as -- i mean -- pick something
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else. >> the guy that blew the whistle on the ubs. we have whistle-blowers in our organization who have been national security whistle-blowers and they found their lives in tatters after the fact. so the problem is -- and when you go to the press i mean i know it is very flip to say just go to the press and the story would have been out. when i was trying to go to the press and get the story out about what was happening in our organization, we couldn't get to the press. the people who got to the press were the people who ultimately destroyed the organization which was not our interest at all. ours was to redeem and rehabilitate it. so it is difficult to get to the press. you know, all of these barriers between you and getting your story out. and that's why whistle-blowers always find it necessary to hire a publicist or someone. we don't have the money for
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that. so our stories get twisted. and manipulated in ways that are often harmful to the institutions that most whistle-blowers are trying to save. they're not trying to destroy it. they're trying to save it. they went up through the channels within the organization and found there was no remedy there. >> stephanie: but do you agree with anybody that this seems a little self-aggrandizing this guy -- three days after he leaks the story he's on tv talking about it? >> absolutely. absolutely. because your real whistle-blowers in the real world, those of us down in the trenches doing the work that tell you about the slime and the food and the dirty water, that tell you about people taking your money and misdirecting it to their own pockets those of us who do that work are not on tv in three days. >> stephanie: i hear ya. sorry, honey. i need a little more time with peter. to plea, it is like -- the other thing is this was the whistle being blown on something we all kind of knew about. this is the patriot act, right?
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whether you agree with it or not, right? [ ♪ "nbc nightly news" ♪ ] we can't talk to you about everything being gay. >> that's all right. it is okay. >> stephanie: liberace lovers got thorsen. he claimed he had a six or seven-year romance with michael jackson. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> wow. >> he liked some girly. >> stephanie: who knows if this is true. he said liberace introduced me and michael in the late '70s about the time thriller was coming out and michael and i became lovers. our relationship went on for six or seven years. he treated me well. the three men healed together while they all recovered from plastic surgery. >> oh, my god. >> stephanie: to be a fly on the wall. >> that's a play for
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off-broadway. liberace and michael jackson all bandaged up. >> you look fabulous. >> thank you. thank you. >> stephanie: liberace and i had both undergone plastic surgery. we all healed at the liberace compound in palm springs. >> oh, my god. >> stephanie: that's the most fabulous gayest thing i've ever heard. >> ever in a million billion years. >> i need two more oxycontin. >> i don't know what to say to that. that's just beyond -- >> attending to them as a nurse. >> stephanie: one of those stories where you're not sure if it's true. remember after 9-11, who got in the car in marlon brando and michael jackson and liz taylor. you couldn't fly. >> supposedly that's true. i've heard that. >> i think they would have needed a trailer for brando. >> stephanie: they had to stop at like every -- >> your joke is not politically
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correct. >> stephanie: had to stop at every fast food place. oh, really? marlon. >> for liz and marlon. >> marlon! >> stephanie: how many stuckeys are there on this highway? we were just at the last in-n-out. >> south of the border? aren't we still in the united states? >> i've been to south of the border, too. if you're an east coast kid, you can't help it. >> stephanie: any other weird story out of hollywood. letters to president obama. there's been a lot of news. we missed this one. >> the actress from the walking dead. >> not the main actresses. >> who's my friend. >> had a small role. so she sent it but she called the feds and blamed her husband. >> stephanie: this is the greatest. ready? next time try writing a break-up letter. try a dear john tweet. anything. that's a really bad way to break up with someone.
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>> stephanie: like "newsweek," really? what do i have to do to get publicity? i just sent rice tonight president. >> i'm sure her star meter went up. >> stephanie: she was charged with sending ricin letters to president obama and mayor bloomberg. feds say they found ricin making materials in her home and letter to obama with the file name muslimbastard.doc. >> come on! >> stephanie: it gets betterrer. the actress confessed to mailing the envelopes claiming her army vet husband had typed the gun boosting letters and forced her to post them. >> sure. >> stephanie: all right. >> did he walk herr to the mailbox? put it in! >> rice-a-roni the right wing whack job treat. >> stephanie: do it. i don't know how! >> it doesn't matter how much you yell.
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man doesn't know how to make ricin. you can scream at me all you want. >> it involves castor beads. i don't know how you do -- >> stephanie: how many, what's the recipe? >> i've never heard of castor beans. >> that's where castor oil comes from. >> which everybody thinks is good for you. but now it makes ricin. >> stephanie: speak, of hollywood actresses that may or may not be. [ cuckoo clock chimes ] >> bruce willis fed up is demi moore. he's selling his mansion to get away from her. >> i blame the niblets in her who-ha. >> stephanie: too much cream corn. >> okay. >> stephanie: my favorite line ever. >> no chance that i'm going to roll around neighbored in creamed corn with a bunch of drunken yahoos trying to stick niblets up my who-ha. >> is that from the stripper? >> can you please get that into the fosters? >> you would be amazed. they're very brave. >> stephanie: then just have someone wink to the camera and
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go love ya, stef. >> we'll just name the character stephanie. a character named stephanie. >> roll around in a bunch of cream corn. >> stephanie: yeah, i don't know. this is the "national enquirer." it is in the paper as i call the "national enquirer." >> the source. >> stephanie: he lives just over three miles apart. he wants to put more distance between them. bruce reached the breaking point when demi failed to show up for their daughter scout's graduation. the action hero attended the ceremony with his second wife and scott's sisters rumer and tallulah who have been at odds with their mom. she's like super cougar. that's what the problem is. >> she's hot as all get out. >> stephanie: demi angered her oldest daughter by beginning a trial marriage with rumer's ex-boyfriend. while trying to finalize -- dating your daughter's ex-boyfriend. >> that's never a good idea. >> no. >> stephanie: she allowed him to move into her beverly hills
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home. he's described as hollywood playboy. demi has since moved on to a new boy toy. 30-year-old australian pearl diver and yoga teacher will hanigan. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: pearl diver? >> wink, wink. >> nudge nudge. >> stephanie: you can only find them in bearded clams. [ buzzer ] >> really very clear. that was gross. [ laughter ] >> i'm an australian pearl diver. >> stephanie: that's hot. >> so if you'll just remove your bikini bottom. i'll get to work. [ laughter ] >> okay, peter line. >> stephanie: all right. >> i will go to work while you take off your bikini bottom. that's all i meant. >> stephanie: 45 minutes after the hour.
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back with the remaining moments and who knows what's next with peter paige on "the stephanie miller show." >> it's fun for ages 8 to 80. join us. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." life was out to use him. (vo) no one brings you more documentaries that are real, gripping, current. john fugelsang: if you believe in states rights but still support the drug war you must be high. cenk uygur: i think the number one thing viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. i think the audience gets that i actually mean it. michael shure: this show is about being up to date so a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i am given to doing
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anyway. joy behar: you can say anything here. jerry springer: i spent a couple of hours with a hooker joy behar: your mistake was writing a check jerry springer: she never cashed it (vo) the day's events. four very unique points of view. tonight starting at 6 eastern.
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(vo) next on current tv. vanguard: the documentary series that raised the bar for excellence. >> we dive deep into the topics that we cover. >> telling important stories that need to be told. (vo)and on the next vanguard: >> one of the things that we seek for, is to die as a martyr. (vo) what drove a small town kid to the arms of radical islam? >> it was so preposterous. if you would ever know a person that would become an international terrorist. >> when you see him you don't see the terrorist. you're like, oh hey thats my friend that i haven't seen in a couple years. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. (vo) she's joy behar. >>current will let me say anything.
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♪ i know where i came from ♪ >> stephanie: all right. okay. 49 minute the after the hour. see because jennifer lopez also coproducing -- and coexecutive producer of -- >> stephanie: the fosters on
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abc family airing at 9:00 p.m. >> check your local listings though. >> or just set your dvr and be done with it. watch the commercials, form the love of god. >> your results may vary. >> stephanie: greg writes about the ricin actress. will she be out of jail in time to play herself in the lifetime movie? >> amanda bynes may have to. >> poor thing. she's having a breakdown. amanda bynes who said the police slapped her vagina. the new york police department issued an actual statement where they said we did not slap her vagina. that's what the world is coming to now. you have to tell the crazy wig-wearing girl that you did not slap her vagina. >> stephanie: to be a fly on the wall. what? okay. >> schmidt get in here! did you slap her vagina? you're fired! >> i don't know.
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>> you slapped her vagina? >> mr. spacely. >> police department. >> okay. >> stephanie: all right. we might have punched her in the [ bleep ], i don't remember. wow. [ ♪ "nbc nightly news" ♪ ] some michael jackson news before the thing. i think it's important to keep up on the jackson family feuds do you not peter paige? i think it's important. janet wants nothing to do with michael's other siblings now. jackie tito, jermaine. >> just when she crosses the billionaire line. she's a billionaire now. >> pretty impressive, you know. there aren't a lot of people who cross that line. >> very few people of color cross that line. >> stephanie: how long was that to the $40 billion to lose my number, tito.
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changed her phone number so they cannot contact her. apparently katherine, the mother is the only one with access to her and the government. >> andrew jackson isn't talking to them at all. >> she just married a saudi prince and that billion dollar number -- it doesn't even count his -- his wealth. >> andrew jackson is in her purse now. >> wow. >> she married a saudi prince. >> stephanie: it seems like a waste of a saudi prince. someone more need -- >> a saudi prince. i need to get me some of that. i'm sorry honey. >> stephanie: that's right. that saudi prince could have gone to someone needier. >> like you. >> stephanie: right! all right. this one i had not heard. i don't know if you've heard of this story peter. there is an anti-semitic elmo attempting to extort the girl
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scouts. gawker brings us the story. >> anti-semitic elmo trying to extort the girl scouts. >> i don't understand any of the piece of this story. >> stephanie: an elmo street performer known for spewing hate speech shouting anti-semitic diatribes and terrorizing -- >> where is this? >> stephanie: dan sandler. he's been yanked back into a courtroom for allegedly attempting to extort $2 million from the girl scouts of america. he said he would disseminate false rumors, mainly that they arranged sexual meetings between the underage scout and adult men. he was going to call them little -- >> what's wrong with you? when you're trying to extort the girl scouts, extort the boy scouts. [ buzzer ] >> that was very funny. >> if you want to hear what he said, get the podcast. >> yikes.
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>> i love that there's a button. dump. >> i did something bad. a button that says dump. >> some day you'll get the fart sound effect. >> stephanie: you can't say [ bleep ] but you can say -- the dump button. we were talking about the michelle obama heckler. did you see this? >> i heard about it. i didn't see it. >> stephanie: i was saying, you don't heckle the first lady, period. first of all you're heckling the wrong person. this administration has done more on gay rights than the other ones combined. i do get her point. she wrote a piece for "the washington post." as a gray-haired 56-year-old lesbian, i don't have enough time to wait for equality. being polite hasn't gotten it closer to become being a reality. the point would be -- first of all, she's not an elected representative. rudely heckling the first lady at a private home doesn't seem to be the best way. your thoughts? >> i have to agree. all though i hear the sentiment behind her statement. i understand that. part of the reason that the gay
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rights movement has been the most expeditious civil rights movement in the history of the world is because people dying and standing up and willing to make some noise. i hear that. that being said, it is michelle obama. come on. knock it off. by the way you know, michelle obama would knock her right out. she was like you can keep talking or i can punch you in the face. [ laughter ] with those arms. she would take you down! >> stephanie: you don't take on a woman with those guns. know what i'm sayin'? obviously the supreme court, we just heard won't rule today on prop 8. likely this week, right? >> or next week. >> usually release their rulings on mondays and so yeah, so maybe next week. >> stephanie: what are you thinkin'? what are you feelin'? what are you hopin'? >> my gut tells me prop 8 will be struck down. there are too many scenarios where it falls. there is only one where it stays. there are five where it falls for different reasons. my gut tells me prop 8 will fall but not in such a way that we
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get national marriage, that it becomes national win. >> stephanie: right. a narrow ruling. in california. >> by the way, it almost doubles the number of people who have access to same-sex marriage. >> that's true. just with that one ruling. it is a big deal. >> stephanie: that's right. >> if doma falls which i also think will happen, it really is the beginning of the end for discrimination. because it will be -- then federal marriage -- state marriages, same-sex marriage will be recognized by the federal government then you get into i got married in california. my marriage is recognized by the federal government. i move to mississippi. my marriage is still recognized by the federal government so we'll have to work this all out. >> stephanie: exactly. jim said there's one thing we know for sure on the supreme court and that is -- >> clarence thomas will say what he said. >> stephanie: there you go. particularly on affirmative action. >> always his opinion. >> stephanie: that guy. >> stephanie: some important stuff.
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voting rights, you know, stuff like that. >> affirmative action will be an interesting case too. i have a feeling that one may fall. i'm not sure it is -- we're quite ready for that. >> jeffrey toobin was telling us he thinks that john -- it's john roberts' goal to undo the civil rights act. >> stephanie: kagan has to excuse herself. voting rights, supreme court set to rule of course on the key provision passed in 1965, voting rights act outlawed discriminatory voting practices poll taxes designed to disenfranchise americans. they found new and unique ways to do that. >> it is oppressive. >> stephanie: when congress, just so people know what this was. when they renewed the law for another 25 years, counties in l.a. and alabama saying special suit was no longer needed. chief justice roberts asked is
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it the government's submission that citizens in the south are more racist than citizens in the north? i would say yes. >> computer says yes. >> stephanie: yes. yes. >> although, i will say this. i've lived all over this country. all over this beautiful great country that we call home. i'm not sure that -- i'm not sure birmingham was any more racist than boston. >> stephanie: really? >> really, i'm just going to say it. boston, i found to be one of the more racist cities i've ever lived in. >> stephanie: lucky for you you're out of time because you have insulted pretty much everyone in every state. i hope you're proud of yourself, peter paige. >> i love america. i love boston and birmingham. >> stephanie: boston viewership. abc family, the fosters on at 9:00 p.m. love you. >> thanks so much for having me.
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i'm jacki schechner. it is noon eastern and here's what's current. president obama is speaking this hour to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the equal pay act. >> obama: when you think about it, we're not just celebrating a law. we're honoring the heroes who made that law possible. fierce determination of americans who saw a wrong and worked to right it. the president is scheduled to speak again this afternoon where he will nominate a new chief white house economist. that man will be jayson furman, long-time adviseert to president who has been key in formulating administration policy on everything from taxes to healthcare reform to how to avoid the fiscal deliver. furman earned his ph.d. from harvard and has served with the president since his first el
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